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Does My LLC Need an EIN?

By IncNow | Published July 27, 2018

  • Why your business should have an EIN, even if it’s a single-owner LLC.
  • Is the information you submit to the IRS about your business accessible to the public?
  • Confused by some of the questions on the SS-4 form? We provide you guidance.

question manDear IncNow,

Does my LLC need an EIN if it’s a small business with one member?

Dear Customer,

A single-member LLC can either use the Social Security Number (SSN) of the single member to conduct business, or it can obtain a separate Employer Identification Number (EIN) from the IRS. IncNow can obtain an EIN for your company for $99. An EIN is required for a multi-member LLC.

It’s recommend that you obtain an EIN number soon after the formation of your LLC, whether you are forming a single-member or multi-member LLC. This avoids confusion between the company and the member, and minimizes potential alter-ego liability. Follow the instructions on the SS-4 Form (the application for the EIN). Here are some common questions:

Box 11: What should I list as my business start date? It is completely up to you to decide when to list the business start date. If you do not know when you will start conducting business in the future, you can list your date of formation.

Box 9a: What type of entity is my LLC? If you have an LLC check the box for “other” and insert LLC.

Box 7a: Do I have to list my SSN? This only applies to US citizens or Legalized Resident Aliens. But the answer is yes, if the Responsible Party possess one, it must be listed on the application.

Box 13: How many employees do I put if I have none, but I wish to bring employees on board down the road? This is question is asking for the number of employees you expect to have within the next 12 months. This number can be an estimation if you have not hired anyone yet.

Will the information on this application become public record? No, this personal information is kept private.

MORE: How to Apply for an EIN

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